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Pujols made the right move to Angels, but the wrong choice

I can’t blame Albert Pujols for taking 10 years, $254 million and a no-trade clause to go to a class organization like the Angels. That being said, he should’ve stayed with the Cardinals.

First I’ll say why it was the right move: When Pujols becomes unable to play the field, the Designated Hitter option will be there. That same option extended Vladimir Guerrero’s career quite a few years. Obviously no matter how much the Cardinals or Marlins offered, they would never be able to let him be a DH.

That’s where the positive aspects end. Here’s why it was the wrong choice:

A few Angels in flux:
There really isn’t a question about the Angels rotation, especially after adding C.J. Wilson to the stable of Jered Weaver, Dan Haren and Ervin Santana. However, in the next few years, they’ll have some key players that will be a little too elder to produce. Torii Hunter is the proposed clean-up hitter and his arc is almost to the end.  Vernon Wells and Bobby Abreu are in the same spot. The Angels up-and-comers will fill in the gaps but they had 200 runs less than the AL West Champion Texas Rangers last season. With just a few years left in Pujols’ prime, the Angels need their offense running on all cylinders.

Some Lost Legacy:
I know this doesn’t really mean anything to anyone anymore, but by staying in St. Louis he would’ve been in the same breath as St. Louis greats Stan “The Man” Musial, Bob Gibson and Lou Brock. Don’t get me wrong, he’ll still get his number retired and probably get a statue outside the stadium, but there’s just something special about guys like Tony Gwynn and Cal Ripken, Jr. staying on the same team their entire careers. Now Cardinal fans will view him as a sellout until the wounds heal – or forever.

Do you think Pujols tainted his legacy forever in St. Louis by leaving? Let me know your thoughts in the comments: